Dig it up!

(Page 1 of 17)   
« Prev
  
1
  2  3  4  5  Next »

News Archive

Scientists scour sunken Roman 'floating museum' off Greek island for overlooked treasures

The Associated Press

In this undated photo provided by Argo via the Greek Culture Ministry on Thursday, Oct. 9, 2014, a diver with a metal detector holds a copper ship's fitting next to a vase at the site of the Antikythera wreck off the island of Antikythera in southern Greece. The ministry said Thursday that a three-week underwater project to revisit the Roman-era wreck, first investigated more than a century ago, has completed detailed maps of the seabed and pinpointed potential metal artifacts. Divers have recovered a bronze spear that was probably part of a large statue, metal fittings from the ship and a vase. (AP Photo/ARGO via Greek Culture Ministry, Brett Seymour)

Inert grenade found on St. Pete Beach

Grenade-1

St. Petersburg Beach, FL -- There were some frightening moments Thursday morning on St. Petersburg Beach when a treasure hunter sweeping the area with a metal detector got far more than he bargained for: hand grenade.

It happened at about 10 a.m. as the man was sweeping the sandy bottom in waist-high water behind the Sirata Beach Resort

It turns out it was an old military grenade, and had probably been there for quite some time. Inert, say sheriff's deputies.

But the men who found it had no way of knowing that when they pulled it out of the water.

"This definitely makes for the most interesting day of metal detecting, yeah," said Cliff Vogan, 61.

Vogan has been treasure hunting along Bay area beaches for about five years now, and has found some odd things before including a bicycle, even a fire extinguisher, he says.

Detectorists: The treasure hunters digging up a fortune

A NEW BBC comedy revolving around the bizarre world of metal detecting starts tomorrow and has already divided the nation’s enthusiasts.
The metal detecting enthusiasts who inspired new BBC 4 comedy Detectorists

Most weekends you’ll find Dave Rees out in the countryside with his metal detector, sweeping the ground and waiting for a tell-tale beep.

The moment there’s a promising tone he’s down on his hands and knees, eagerly scraping away at the surface of the ground with a trowel.

The 66-year-old recently unearthed a 2,000-year-old Roman coin in a field in Wiltshire, to add to his small collection of ancient finds.

Metal detectors mine memories

barbee

Published: Sunday, September 28, 2014 at 05:08 PM.

Jerry Barbee can’t begin to count the number of rings, Civil War relics and coins he’s collected through his four decades of metal detecting, but he can certainly remember the first silver coin he found.

His daughter Libby lost her half dollar in the yard on her way to the bus.  With his metal detector in hand, he was able to find the coin and return it to his daughter.

“I’ve always been interested in discovery and the anticipation of discovery,” he said. “I love to discover things, especially older things.”

Ancient coins found by metal detectors

Metal detectorists begin their search for historic treasures
Metal detectorists begin their search for historic treasures

by

A CACHE of coins has been found by metal detectorists as part of a special event to raise money for worthy causes.

About 150 enthusiasts from the UK and abroad spent four days searching land at Rivers Hall Farm in Boxted.

They paid a fee to take part in the search and enjoyed a weekend which included entertainment and raffle.

Over the four days, the treasure hunters found a number of items among which were 11 gold coins including Roman coins, three Celtic staters, a Chinese coin and a Charles I rose shilling.

Other finds included two bronze age sword tips, musket balls and belt clips.

They also raised £5,000 which will be donated to another of the county's treasures, the Essex Community Foundation.

Grant's Getaways: Oregon Shipwrecks



by Grant McOmie

Bio | Email | Follow: @KGWNews

kgw.com

Posted on February 28, 2013 at 1:40 PM

Updated Friday, Mar 1 at 4:52 PM

There’s something about treasure hunting that’s irresistible and compelling; especially when it touches Oregon history and offers unique outdoor adventures too.

Rich Mulcahy likes to say, “When the tide goes out, the treasure table is set.”

“I think it’s that I am going after something that’s been lost, and I am digging in the sand to find it. I love to dig stuff.”

Rich walks long lonely stretches of the Oregon coast each day accompanied only by the excited sounds of his hand-held detector; the device is his constant companion.

New evidence sheds light on how the Hunley sank a Union ship


The new evidence suggests the Hunley was less than 20 feet away from its torpedo when it exploded. Remnants of the 2-foot-long torpedo were found bolted to the 16-foot-long spar.

The discovery indicates that the torpedo, which held 135 pounds of gunpowder, did not separate from the spar but instead was placed under the Union ship. It was fired by command, not contact.

"There is overwhelming evidence to indicate this was not a suicide mission," South Carolina Lt. Gov. Glenn McConnell, a Hunley commissioner, said in a statement. "They must have believed this was a safe enough distance to escape any harm. If so, they were at least partially right. Thus far, no damage has been found on the actual submarine caused by the explosion."

Because of the Hunley's proximity to the Housatonic and the amount of gunpowder, the concussion from the explosion could have damaged the sub and injured the crew. "Were some or all of them knocked out?" McConnell asked. "How long were they knocked out? Did the submarine's structure with rivets have a similar problem as the Titanic did when it brushed against the iceberg?" He added, "If the rivets give, the pressure of the water could cause leakage."

Scientists will use the new information to create computer simulations of the attack. Scientists also will start peeling away a layer of rock, sand and silt from the sub.

Victory's Civil War drummer boy writes about Bull Run


012713-llf-sayles.jpg

Low lake levels leave plenty of ground for metal detectors to cover


By Robert Medley | Published: January 20, 2013



On a crisp, sunny day on the west side of Lake Hefner, Larry Dobbs walks on what once was water.

His metal detector makes a long beep followed by several short beeps. He's found something under the soft soil. With a trowel he digs up a 2-ounce lead fishing sinker.

photo - Larry Dobbs uses a metal detector Thursday as he looks for lost items at Lake Hefner in Oklahoma City. Area lakes are very low because of the recent drought.
Larry Dobbs uses a metal detector Thursday as he looks for lost items at Lake Hefner in Oklahoma City. Area lakes are very low because of the recent drought.

On a crisp, sunny day on the west side of Lake Hefner, Larry Dobbs walks on what once was water.

His metal detector makes a long beep followed by several short beeps. He's found something under the soft soil. With a trowel he digs up a 2-ounce lead fishing sinker.

Nearby, Dan Pierce is slowly swinging his metal detector back and forth.

“I've got money,” Pierce said. He digs up a copper penny. It's the start of this day's hunt.

Treasure hunters in Oklahoma have found more ground to cover because of extended drought. On dry lakeshores, where the water used to be, metal detectors are finding collectible items

Click more to see video

Civil War artifacts

By Anita Stienstra

 -


This week the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library opened its third installment of the Boys in Blue Civil War exhibit. Featured is the Battle of Vicksburg, Emancipation Proclamation, Civil War prisons and prisoners, immigrant and Jewish Union soldiers and Gen. U.S. Grant. Artifacts from the library’s collections and other objects on display include such items as an oversized broadside of Gen. Grant in the atrium, seven-foot-tall reproductions of Union soldiers, framed letters, photos and documents, spurs, tourniquet and medical kit and a Confederate jacket loaned to a Springfield soldier while imprisoned during the war.

Boys in Blue: When Will This Cruel War Be Over?
Jan. 15-March 2014, Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm
Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library
112 N. Sixth Street
558-8970




(Page 1 of 17)   
« Prev
  
1
  2  3  4  5  Next »